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Empirical research

Generalizability of Indicators from the New York City Macroscope Electronic Health Record Surveillance System to Systems Based on Other EHR Platforms

Authors:

Katharine H. McVeigh ,

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
About Katharine H.
PhD, MPH
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Elizabeth Lurie-Moroni,

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (at the time of the study)
About Elizabeth
MPH
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Pui Ying Chan,

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
About Pui Ying
MPH
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Remle Newton-Dame,

NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (at the time of the study)
About Remle
MPH
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Lauren Schreibstein,

NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (at the time of the study)
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MA
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Kathleen S. Tatem,

NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (at the time of the study)
About Kathleen S.
MPH
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Matthew L. Romo,

City University of New York School of Pubic Health
About Matthew L.
PharmD, MPH
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Lorna E. Thorpe,

New York University School of Medicine, Department of Population Health
About Lorna E.
PhD
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Sharon E. Perlman

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
About Sharon E.
MPH
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Abstract

Introduction: The New York City (NYC) Macroscope is an electronic health record (EHR) surveillance system based on a distributed network of primary care records from the Hub Population Health System. In a previous 3-part series published in eGEMS, we reported the validity of health indicators from the NYC Macroscope; however, questions remained regarding their generalizability to other EHR surveillance systems.

Methods: We abstracted primary care chart data from more than 20 EHR software systems for 142 participants of the 2013-14 NYC Health and Nutrition Examination Survey who did not contribute data to the NYC Macroscope. We then computed the sensitivity and specificity for indicators, comparing data abstracted from EHRs with survey data.

Results: Obesity and diabetes indicators had moderate to high sensitivity (0.81-0.96) and high specificity (0.94-0.98). Smoking status and hypertension indicators had moderate sensitivity (0.78-0.90) and moderate to high specificity (0.88-0.98); sensitivity improved when the sample was restricted to records from providers who attested to Stage 1 Meaningful Use. Hyperlipidemia indicators had moderate sensitivity (≥0.72) and low specificity (≤0.59), with minimal changes when restricting to Stage 1 Meaningful Use.

Discussion: Indicators for obesity and diabetes used in the NYC Macroscope can be adapted to other EHR surveillance systems with minimal validation. However, additional validation of smoking status and hypertension indicators is recommended and further development of hyperlipidemia indicators is needed.

Conclusion: Our findings suggest that many of the EHR-based surveillance indicators developed and validated for the NYC Macroscope are generalizable for use in other EHR surveillance systems.

How to Cite: McVeigh KH, Lurie-Moroni E, Chan PY, Newton-Dame R, Schreibstein L, Tatem KS, et al.. Generalizability of Indicators from the New York City Macroscope Electronic Health Record Surveillance System to Systems Based on Other EHR Platforms. eGEMs (Generating Evidence & Methods to improve patient outcomes). 2017;5(1):25. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/egems.247
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Published on 07 Dec 2017.
Peer Reviewed

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